Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Cancer Diagnosis & Treatment Oslo, Norway.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Shiaw-Yih Lin

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA

Keynote: Signature-guided approaches for targeting DNA damage response defects in cancer

Time : 9:00-9:50

Conference Series Cancer Treatment 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shiaw-Yih Lin photo
Biography:

Dr. Shiaw-Yih (Phoebus) Lin is a tenured professor and Deputy Chair of Department of Systems Biology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Lin’s research efforts are focused within an overall theme of DNA damage response defects in cancer with the specific emphasis on systems and translational precision cancer therapy. Dr. Lin serves on editorial boards of ten international journals and has served on numerous grant review committees for NIH, DOD and other funding organizations both nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

Defects of DNA damage response are considered as a hallmark of human cancer. Deficiencies in these responses, particularly in repair of different damaged DNA are of tremendous importance in the etiology of human cancers and at the same time offer great opportunities for designing targeted therapeutic strategies. Based on transcriptome analysis, we have established gene signature that faithfully predicted the defect of homologous recombination repair (HRD), replication stress response defect (RSRD) and mismatch repair defect (MMRD) in cells. In addition, based on these signatures, we identified effective drugs that can target on cancer with these specific DNA repair defects. Our studies, therefore, provide a unique platform to develop personalized cancer therapy based on the unique deficiency of DNA repair in the individual cancer.

Keynote Forum

Kazuko Tatsumura

Gaia Holistic Health USA and Japan

Keynote: Effects of Far-Infrared & Terahertz Onnetsu Therapy on Rheumatoid Arthritis and Various Cancers

Time : 9:50-10:40

Conference Series Cancer Treatment 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kazuko Tatsumura photo
Biography:

Graduated from Toho Academy of Music in Tokyo, as a pianist and composer, invited by the Boston Symphony, she came to the USA in 1961 as one of the first Japanese women. She then received Master of Art from New York University and finished her Ph.D. credits in Philosophy in 1965. In 1967, Tatsumura then turned to an independent career and became the top International Classical and Cultural Impresario/producer. Until 1992, she produced an average of 2,000 cultural events each year, traveling to more than 140 countries. She was presented with numerous honors for her work. She studied Oriental Traditional Medicine of Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. In 2,000 she received her PHD and OMD from the International Academy of Education in Tokyo. She established the Oki-Do Holistic Health Center in 1994 in NY and in 2001 the GAIA Holistic Center (501C3 nonprofit organization)at the wake of 9/11 tragedy, for body mind and spirit, aiming for the noninvasive natural healing methods based on the wisdom of the East. Dr. Kazuko Tatsumura has written numerous articles and several books: FE “Overcoming Cancer and Other Diseases in a Holistic Way”, “Your Immune Revolution & Healing Your Healing Power “(with Toru Abo, M.D.) Dr. Kazuko has been invited as a speaker at World Congresses of Holistic Health. She teaches and lectures all over the world. She has received many honors from different countries, many for humanitarian causes. She is well known as a philanthropist.

Abstract:

Onnetsu means comfortable heat. Dr Kazuko Onnetsu Therapy invented by Dr. Kazuko Tatsumura Hillyer emits from a special ceramic; 1) precise 8-10 micron of vibration of infrared SunRay, 2) vibration of Terahertz and 3) various degrees of heat. When Onnetsuki is slid over the skin, healthy areas are comfortable, but if deep tissue which is cold unhealthy or degenerated “hot spot” is detected by the temperature sensation reported by the patient. Dr Kazuko Onnetsu Therapy is both a diagnostic and therapeutic. When this hot spot is effectively treated with far-infrared, terahertz and heat, Dr Kazuko Onnetsu Therapy, the hot sensation subsides, and the disease conditions improve. Dr Kazuko’s protocol must be followed. Dr Kazuko Onnetsu Therapy is based on four historical and scientific facts: 1. NASA's finding regarding far-infrared vibration from sun light is 8-10 micron only. Also, added is the specific Terahertz vibration: Healing vibration; 2. Traditional Japanese Concept of the significance of Body Temperature; Raising Cold Temperature; 3. Immunology Theory by Dr Toru Abo, balancing autonomic nervous system to improve condition of white cells; Raising Immunity; 4. Promoting four flows of energy through acupuncture technique: blood, body fluid, Oxygen, Ki (Chi). Dr Kazuko has taught her Onnetsu Therapy to MDs and health practitioners over the past decades all over the world have been practicing it in the hospitals and clinics. Clinical Trials have shown improvements on cases (including but not limited to) as arthritis, asthma, various cancers, diabetes, tuberculosis and various painful conditions. Clinical studies from Cuba and Peru will be presented.

  • Organ specific Cancer: Diagnosis & Treatment | Cancer Epidemiology |Cancer Biopsy | Biomarkers in Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis | Cancer Screening Test | Cancer Diagnostics and Imaging | Technology Used in Cancer Detection | Surgical Oncology | Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment | Cancer Radiation Therapy | Chemotherapy | Molecular Targeted Cancer Therapy and Precision Medicines |Immunotherapy | Cell and Gene Therapy |Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) |Cancer Control and Palliative care | Transplantation to treat Cancer | Biobanking in Cancer |Cancer Epigenetics | Cancer Preventive Vaccine

Session Introduction

Athena Guo

MicroSurfaces, Inc., USA

Title: Low background and high sensitivity protein microarrays for bio-marker screening and profiling

Time : 11:00-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Athena Guo has received her PhD degree in Biochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. After Post-doctoral training at NIH and Washington University School of Medicine, and briefly joining the Research faculty at University of Minnesota, she founded MicroSurfaces, Inc. and has served as its CEO since. She was a member on several NIH study sessions, author of 30 scientific papers and patents, and PI on multiple SBIR awards from NIH and NSF. She has been responsible for the development and launch of MicroSurfaces’ product lines, e.g. the ZeroBkg® surfaces, Fluid Array surfaces, etc. to serve the biomedical research community.

Abstract:

Protein microarray or protein chip is an important tool in proteomics. It allows the expression and functional profiling of thousands of biomarkers in a single shot. However, duplicating the success of the DNA chip for the protein chip has been difficult. This arises in part from difficulties with surface chemistry. Ideally, the surface chemistry for protein microarray fabrication should satisfy the following criteria: the surface resists non-specific adsorption; bonding between a protein molecule and a solid surface is balanced to provide sufficient stability but minimal disturbance to the delicate three-dimensional structure of the protein; and the local chemical environment favors the immobilized protein molecules to retain their native conformation and activity. The low background and high sensitivity condition is particularly important for applications involving biomarkers in complex samples, such as serum or plasma. We have developed functional surfaces based on our proprietary high density poly-ethyleneglycol (PEG) brushes. The PEG brush not only ensures exceptionally low background but also provides an optimal local environment for the immobilized protein molecules to retain optimal activity. We explore the application of PEG brush surfaces in cancer research by systematically comparing the sensitivity and specificity of protein microarrays in biomarker profiling with the traditional diagnostics method of ELISA. These experiments demonstrate the potential of our optimized protein microarrays in the detection of low abundance biomarkers.

Speaker
Biography:

Graham Ball is a Professor of Bioinformatics at Nottingham Trent University and CSO of CompanDX UK and CompanDX China Ltd. He is an Associate Director of the John Van Geest Cancer Research Centre and Biostatistics Lead on three clinical projects. He has been involved in the development and validation of bioinformatics algorithms using artificial neural networks for the last 18 years. He has 230 journal papers and five patents in this area. His current research is focused on characterization of biological systems, including diagnostic and classification modelling of cancer molecular pathology, host response to disease and identification of molecular targets for therapy.

Abstract:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy with variable response to treatment. Recurring cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations are important prognosticators. However, 50-70% of AML cases harbor either normal or risk-indeterminate karyotypes. The identification of better biomarkers of clinical outcome is therefore necessary to inform tailored therapeutic decisions. We applied an artificial neural network (ANN) based machine learning approach to a discovery cohort of 641 adults with newly diagnosed AML. ANN analysis identified a parsimonious 3-gene expression signature predictive of survival, which comprised CALCRL, CD109 and LSP1. We computed a prognostic index (PI) from these markers using normalized gene expression levels and b-values from subsequently created Cox proportional hazards models with coupled with clinically established prognosticators. Our 3-gene PI separated the adult patients in each ELN cytogenetic risk category into subgroups with different survival probabilities and identified patients with very high-risk features, such as those with a high PI and either FLT3-ITD or non-mutated NPM1. The ability of the 3-gene PI to stratify survival was validated in two independent adult cohorts (n=221 subjects). Our ANN derived 3-gene signature applied to cox proportional hazards models by way of validation refined the accuracy of patient stratification and improved outcome prediction.

Speaker
Biography:

Yeu Su has completed his PhD from University of Wisonsin-Madison. He is a Professor of the Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences of National Yang-Ming University, a premier research university in Taiwan. He has published more than 55 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of several repute journals.

Abstract:

Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been shown to play a critical role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hence, the inhibition of STAT3 signaling has been suggested to be a viable therapeutic approach for cancer. Moreover, the efficacy of combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs and napabucasin, a small-molecule STAT3 inhibitor, have been assessed in various clinical trials, including those involving patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Two recently developed small-molecule STAT3 inhibitors, SC-43 and SC-78, which can stimulate small heterodimer partner-1 (SHP-1) to inactivate STAT3, were found to have anti-tumor activity. In this study, the inhibitory effects of SC-43, SC-78, and regorafenib (a reference drug) on cell viability, STAT3 phosphorylation, and various stemness properties [e.g., sphere-forming and soft agar colony-forming abilities, CD133+/CD44+ (stem cell-like) subpopulations and the expression of several CSC markers] were examined for both HCT-116 and HT-29 human CRC cells. We found that SC-43 and SC-78 but not regorafenib inhibited constitutively and IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, respectively. Moreover, SC-43 and SC-78 were more potent than regorafenib in suppressing the stemness properties (except stem cell-like subpopulations) of these cells. As expected, SHP-1 knockdown almost completely abolished the suppressive effects of SC-43 and SC-78 on the sphere formation in both cell lines. Furthermore, SC-43 and SC-78 showed synergistic inhibitory effects with oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan on sphere formation. Overall, our results suggest that SC-43 and SC-78 are potent STAT3 inhibitors that may potentially be used in combination therapy for CRC.

Speaker
Biography:

Prasanta Kumar Nayak is working as an Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, which is a premier institute run by the Government of India. He is working as MD in Obstetrics and Gynecology and is trained in Endoscopic surgery. He has published more than 20 scientific articles in various reputed international and national peer reviewed journals. He is also working as an Editorial Board Member of various reputed journals. He has presented many papers and delivered talks at various international and national conferences.

Abstract:

Introduction: Cervical cancer which is preventable is the commonest genital cancer in developing countries including India. Implementation of several screening strategies has led to a remarkable decline in the cervical cancer incidence and mortality worldwide. Conventional Pap smear which is the primary and most widely used screening tool carries 10-70% false negative rate. In low-resource settings, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and Lugol’s iodine (VILI) are promising alternatives owing to their simplicity, rapidity of results, cost-effectiveness and comparable performance in mass screening for cervical cancer. Assessment of women with colposcopy impressions of the cervical transformation zone and histological appraisal of directed punch biopsies is an excellent method but less commonly used. The reported sensitivity of colposcopy in some Indian study has been shown to be, 60-98% for the detection of intraepithelial disease. A high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported from adolescent and young adult tribal women of Central India, but HPV DNA testing is still not widely available and is expensive. Data on effectiveness of all these screening methods, which are less expensive and less resource-intensive, are limited from this geographical territory. This study will help to provide insights into the diagnostic performance of these techniques in a hospital based screening when used alone or in combination.

Methodology: All married women between 21 to 65 years attending gynecology OPD of AIIMS, Raipur and having unhealthy cervix (presence of cervical erosion, cervix which bleeds on touch, ulcerated lesions, growth, with history of post coital bleeding) were included after informed consent. Detailed history was elicited. All women were subjected to conventional Pap smear, VIA, VILI and colposcopy. Reid colposcopic index scoring was performed. Directed biopsy was taken in case of any suspicious lesion detected on VIA, VILI or colposcopy. Diagnostic values of each screening method were determined in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value.

Results: Total 352 patients were evaluated. Around 49% of the patients were found to have abnormal cytology in biopsy reports. The sensitivity and specificity of Pap smear was found to be 34% and 94%, at the same time colposcopy has high sensitivity and low specificity i.e. 99% and 31%. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of VIA and VILI are comparable i.e. 65% and 45% and 64% and 48% respectively. Pap smear shows high positive predictive value i.e. 85% and colposcopy shows 58% for the same. The positive predictive value of VIA and VILI are 55%.

Conclusion: So, there is a need to investigate alternative strategies which are more practical, feasible, effective, and whose results are available immediately. Pap’s smear is subjective test, slides can be mislabeled or lost and carries low sensitivity but high positive predictive value. As compared to Pap smear, VIA and VILI are more sensitive and are of low cost. Colposcopy can be considered as a preferred method of screening due to its extremely high sensitivity.

Rakesh Roy

Saroj Gupta Cancer Centre & Research Institute, India

Title: Scope of adding chemotherapy in patients receiving palliative care

Time : 14:30-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Rakesh Roy is the acting Incharge of Medical Oncology & Palliative Care of a Tertiary Care Cancer Centre in Kolkata, India. He has been an eminent Speaker of the city in various esteemed Oncology Forum. He has numerous publications under his belt. He is a key opinion leader and holds membership to numerous bodies. His centre has been reaccredited by the prestigious ESMO - “Centre for  Integrated Oncology and Palliative Care”. His research interests include chemotherapy, palliation in cancer, symptom control in cancer patients and survival in advanced cancer.

Abstract:

In patients with advanced solid tumours, the aim is to provide symptom management in order to improve quality of life and at times improve survival. Palliative care improves quality of life by addressing symptom burden. The burning question is who are the patients who should receive only palliative care and not added anticancer therapy ? Various patient and disease related factors like – burden of symptom, type of solid tumour, chemosensitivity of the tumour, performance status of patient, past treatment, hormonal sensitivity for breast and prostate cancers, life expectancy, patient and caregiver’s wish, evidence from literatures, enthusiasm of oncologists to do something good for patients, more and more use of targeted therapy, improvement in medical science, price drop of certain drugs, clinical trials etc may contribute to higher number of patients getting chemotherapy in advanced settings. In settings where there is a limitation of resource and paucity of clinical trials less patients end up getting palliative chemotherapy, and those who get it, if selection is inappropiate then a horrible turn of events may reduce Quality of Life (QOL). Situation has changed with introduction of less toxic and more molecularly driven targeted agents. These drugs are prolonging survival with accepted toxicity profile. Many patients have ended getting anticancer agents in their last month of life. This current talk tries to discuss at length the scope of adding chemotherapy as a tool of palliation and survival improvement along with institutional palliative care.

Mahdi Akhbardeh

Tehran medical university. Iran

Title: Review article Diet and the risk of gastric cancer

Time : 15:10-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

There are geographic and ethnic differences in the incidence of gastric cancer around the world as well as with its trends for each population over time. The incidence patterns observed among immigrants change according to where they live. All of these factors serve to indicate the close association of gastric cancer with modifies factors such as diet. This review presents epidemiological evidence on the association between dietary factors and gastric cancer based on previous systematic reviews and subsequent updates. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a strong and established risk factor of gastric cancer but is not a sufficient cause for its development. Substantial evidence from ecological, case-control, and cohort studies strongly suggests that the risk may be increased with a high intake of various traditional salt-preserved foods and salt per se and decreased with a high intake of fruit and vegetables, particularly fruit. However, it remains unclear which constituents in fruit and vegetables play a significant role in gastric cancer prevention, among them, vitamin C is a plausible candidate supported by a relatively large body of epidemiological evidence. Consumption of green tea is possibly associated with a decreased risk of gastric cancer, although the protective effects have been, for the most part, identified in Japanese women, most of whom are nonsmokers. In contrast, processed meat and N-Nitroso compounds may be positively associated with the risk of gastric cancer. Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between nutrition and stomach cancer is reviewed. Stomach cancer shows a distinct international variation and dramatic worldwide decline. These descriptive features suggest that dietary factors are important in determining the risk of stomach cancer. The authors assessed relevant data regarding specific dietary hypotheses in the etiology of stomach cancer. A negative association with fresh vegetables and fruits is highly consistent in numerous case-control studies in different populations. Both epidemiologic and experimental data suggest that vitamins C and carotenoids lower risk of stomach cancer. Evidence is sparse and inconsistent as to protective effects of vitamin E and selenium. Epidemiologic studies have not lent, and will not provide, supportive evidence for an etiologic role of nitrate intake. High salt intake has been associated with an increased risk in many case-control studies and limited cohort studies. Taken together with animal data, it is considered that high salt intake is a risk factor for stomach cancer. Both epidemiologic and experimental data are inconclusive as to whether high-starch diets confer an increased risk. Cohort studies using quantitative dietary assessment and biologic measurement of micronutrients are needed for further understanding of etiologic roles of dietary factors in the causation of stomach cancer. In conclusion, dietary modification by reducing salt and salted food intake, as well as by increasing intake of fruit and vitamin C, represents a practical strategy to prevent gastric cancer.